Household symptomatic contact screening of sputum smear positive tuberculosis patients at the DOTS clinic of SGT hospital, Gurugram

Published

2022-12-31

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47203/IJCH.2022.v34i04.013

Keywords:

Awareness, Contact Screening, Household, Risk Factors, Villages

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Issue

Section

Original Article

Authors

  • Siddharth Naresh SGT Medical College Hospital & Research Institute, Gurugram, Haryana https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1466-9007
  • Monika Sharma SGT Medical College Hospital & Research Institute, Gurugram, Haryana https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6666-7583
  • Varinder singh Adesh Medical College and Hospital, Mohri, Haryana
  • Bhupinder Kaur Anand Adesh medical college and hospital Mohri, Haryana
  • Pankaj Verma SGT Medical College Hospital & Research Institute, Gurugram, Haryana
  • Manvinder Pal Singh Marwaha Air Force Station Chandigarh

Abstract

Background:  Contact screening was conducted under ICMR (REFERENCE ID: 2019-07811) programme in villages near SGT hospital, Gurugram.  Objective:  To evaluate risk factors, extent of spread of tuberculosis among household contacts of tuberculosis cases and to create awareness. Methods and Material: Address of TB cases were taken from RNTCP register at DOTS clinic, SGT medical college. Then all household contacts of positive cases were screened, counselled and advised to approach ASHA Workers if such symptoms appear. Data was analysed using appropriate statistical methods. Results:21 Index cases along with 94 household contacts were screened. 61.90% families still use chullahs for cooking. 76.1% families have overcrowding. 3) 61.90% families had inadequate ventilation 4) 19.05%families were aware about the spread of this disease. 5)Only 23.80% families practised adequate sanitation methods and precautions6) 42.8% Index cases had a history of smoking. 7) 44.4% 4 continue to smoke with infection. The association of adequate sanitation with presence of awareness was found to be statistically significant. (p-value<0.05). Other factors were not significantly associated with level of awareness regarding prevention of tuberculosis spread among study participants. Conclusions: Contact screening is an effective tool and it gives the real-time picture of TB in India.

How to Cite

1.
Naresh S, Sharma M, singh V, Anand BK, Verma P, Marwaha MPS. Household symptomatic contact screening of sputum smear positive tuberculosis patients at the DOTS clinic of SGT hospital, Gurugram. Indian J Community Health [Internet]. 2022 Dec. 31 [cited 2023 Feb. 6];34(4):521-4. Available from: https://iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/article/view/2440

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