Perspectives of Teachers at Medical Colleges Across India regarding the Competency based Medical Education Curriculum – A Qualitative, Manual, Theoretical Thematic Content Analysis

Authors

  • Jeevithan Shanmugam KMCH Institute of Health Sciences and Research, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6289-587X
  • Rashmi Ramanathan KMCH Institute of Health Sciences and Research, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
  • Mohan Kumar KMCH Institute of Health Sciences and Research, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4599-4160
  • Sridhar M Gopalakrishna KMCH Institute of Health Sciences and Research, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
  • Kalanithi T Palanisamy KMCH Institute of Health Sciences and Research, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1718-514X
  • Seetharaman Narayanan KMCH Institute of Health Sciences and Research, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2573-5612

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47203/IJCH.2023.v35i01.007

Keywords:

Cross-Sectional Studies, Feedback, Goals, Search Engine, Curriculum, Faculty, Students, Attitude

Abstract

Background: Competency-based medical education (CBME) curriculum has been implemented in India since 2019 with a goal to create an “Indian Medical Graduate” (IMG) possessing requisite knowledge, skills, attitudes, values, and responsiveness. Objectives: To explore teachers’ perceptions across India at medical colleges on the newly implemented competency-based medical education curriculum.

Methods: This was a qualitative cross?sectional study conducted among teachers working at medical colleges across India, between February and April 2022 (n = 192). The data collection was done using Google forms online survey platform on teachers’ perception regarding CBME, its specific components, and perceived bottlenecks. We analyzed this qualitative data using manual, theoretical thematic content analysis following the steps endorsed in Braun and Clarke’s six-phase framework.

Results: The majority of the teachers (64.1%) have positively responded to the CBME curriculum’s implementation. However, it came with a caution that the curriculum should continuously evolve and adapt to regional demands. The foundation course, early clinical exposure, and the family adoption program were the specific components of CBME curriculum over which the teachers raised concerns. The need for additional teachers in each department (department-specific teacher or faculty per hundred students ratio to be worked out) and the need for enabling faculty preparedness through adequate training was highlighted. Concerns were also raised regarding implementing CBME with teachers without a medical background (especially in preclinical departments). Conclusion: It is the need of the hour for the curriculum to incorporate a systematic feedback mechanism built into the system, though which such critical appraisals can be meaning collated and acted upon, to ultimately evolve, thereby creating an “Indian Medical Graduate” for the needs of todays’ society.

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Published

2023-03-31

How to Cite

1.
Shanmugam J, Ramanathan R, Kumar M, M Gopalakrishna S, T Palanisamy K, Narayanan S. Perspectives of Teachers at Medical Colleges Across India regarding the Competency based Medical Education Curriculum – A Qualitative, Manual, Theoretical Thematic Content Analysis. Indian J Community Health [Internet]. 2023 Mar. 31 [cited 2024 Apr. 16];35(1):32-7. Available from: https://iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/article/view/2502

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