Myths and misbelieves regarding COVID vaccines in India

Published

2022-03-31

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47203/IJCH.2022.v34i01.009

Keywords:

COVID-19, COVID vaccination, Vaccine adverse effects, vaccine beneficiaries, Cross sectional Study

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Original Article

Authors

  • Abhishek Mishra Lala Lajpat Rai Memorial Medical College, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2084-1416
  • Tanveer Bano Lala Lajpat Rai Memorial Medical College, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh
  • Chhaya Mittal Lala Lajpat Rai Memorial Medical College, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8067-7668
  • Ganesh Singh Lala Lajpat Rai Memorial Medical College, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh
  • Niharika Verma Lala Lajpat Rai Memorial Medical College, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh
  • Arun Kumar The BioBankIndia Foundation(BBIF),New Delhi

Abstract

Background: - COVID-19 is the most important public health problem of recent time. Many people require hospitalization after infection. COVID vaccination is the most effective way to prevent the disease. Due to extensive negative publicity through social media channels/platforms,significant number of individuals are not coming forward for vaccination. Therefore, study is needed to evaluate adverse effects associated with different vaccines available in India. Objectives: - To assess the adverse effects associated with COVID-19 vaccination and compare the side effect of two most commonly used COVID vaccines in India. Methods:- In the current report, a cross sectional study was conducted among beneficiaries of COVID-19 vaccines at the vaccination center of the LLRM Medical college, India. After institutional ethical clearance and informed consent, patients were asked about the symptoms they experienced after vaccination. A very simple random sampling approach was used to select beneficiaries. Information was collected on predesigned Google form and total 391 patients submitted the responses. Results:- Out of total respondents 77 % individuals reported one or more symptoms. Fever was reported to be most common problem (59.3%) followed by body ache (57.5%). Out of total beneficiaries, 68.3% experienced mild symptoms while 23% remain asymptomatic. Only few subjects reported moderate adverse effects (8.7%).  None of the respondent reported severe and serious adverse effect. Conclusions:- Vaccine associated adverse effects were found less than 3 days and of mild variety in most of the beneficiaries. There was no difference in adverse effect profile of two commonly used vaccines in India. People must come forward for vaccination in mass without fearing of adverse effects of vaccines.

How to Cite

1.
Mishra A, Tanveer Bano, Mittal C, Singh G, Verma N, Kumar A. Myths and misbelieves regarding COVID vaccines in India. Indian J Community Health [Internet]. 2022 Mar. 31 [cited 2022 Oct. 6];34(1):42-8. Available from: https://iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/article/view/2252

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