Impact of Playing Violent Video Games Among School Going Children

Published

2019-09-30

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47203/IJCH.2019.v31i03.007

Keywords:

Violent Video Games, School Children, Adolescents

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Section

Original Article

Authors

  • Salman Khalil Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University , Aligarh
  • Farheen Sultana Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh
  • Khursheed Muzammil College of Applied Medical Sciences, Khamis Mushayt Campus, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA)
  • Farzana Alim Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh
  • Nazim Nasir College of Applied Medical Sciences, Khamis Mushayt Campus, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0873-0502
  • Atiq ul Hassan College of Applied Medical Sciences, Khamis Mushayt Campus, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7972-6415
  • Syed Esam Mahmood College of Medicine, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5264-5677

Abstract

Introduction: Children who play violent video games can become violent and aggressive. An aggressive emotional change in their behavior and deviation in academic performance is usually noticed. Aim: To assess the impact of violent video games playing among school going adolescents. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among a random sample of 400 adolescents recruited from four selected English medium schools of a City of Northern India by convenient sampling. Each student was interviewed by using a self-structured questionnaire which covered demographics, video gaming behaviors, and effects of video game playing on adolescents. Statistical Analysis: Collected data were entered in Microsoft Excel and subjected to suitable statistical tests. Results: 83.75% of the participants play video games while 1/3rd preferred to play violent games. 72.24% of the parents did not monitor the video game content of their children. Both boys (58.56%) and girls (17.12%) got aggressive during parent’s interference while playing violent video games. Most of the male (62.07%) were willing to apply actions of violent video games in real life. About 63.21% male violent video gamers showed poor academic performance as compared to girls (33.33%). Conclusion: Adolescents and their parents should be updated about the negative impact of excessive video game playing on health and psychosocial functioning.

How to Cite

1.
Khalil S, Sultana F, Muzammil K, Alim F, Nasir N, Hassan A ul, Mahmood SE. Impact of Playing Violent Video Games Among School Going Children. Indian J Community Health [Internet]. 2019 Sep. 30 [cited 2022 Oct. 6];31(3):331-7. Available from: https://iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/article/view/1217

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