Aerosols exposure and respiratory morbidity among dental health care Professionals of Lucknow

Published

2019-12-31

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47203/IJCH.2019.v31i04.013

Keywords:

Aerosols, respiratory morbidities, dental professionals

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Section

Original Article

Authors

  • Syed Esam Mahmood King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Ausaf Ahmad Integral Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh
  • Nadeem Ahmad Taibah University, Al-Madinah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Khursheed Muzammil Khamis Mushait Campus, King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Mahesh Chander Integral Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh
  • Shireen Siddiqui Integral Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

Abstract

Introduction: Dentists use high-energy equipment, such as drills and scalers in the presence of bodily fluids such as blood and saliva, and dental plaque. This combined effect generates aerosols of oral micro-organisms, and blood. Objective: To determine the prevalence of respiratory morbidities and practices for protection against aerosols exposure at work place among dental health care professionals in District Lucknow. Methods: This cross-sectional study involved private dental practitioners registered with Indian Dental Association chosen by Simple Random Sampling. Dentists who gave consent and who were practicing for at least 1 year were included. Aerosol exposure and respiratory morbidity was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. SPSS software version 16.0 was used for data analysis. Results: Total number of study participants were 0. Mean age in years of study subjects were 33.5 ±11.6. Their average years of involvement in clinical practice were 10.0 ±12.75. Majority of dental practitioners used hand scalers (70%) and power scalers (80%) on patients. A higher proportion changed their masks by the day (60%).  Majority used protective eye goggles (70%). Only 30% used high efficiency particulate room filters while 20% used humidifiers and air purification systems. One fifth of respondents usually had cough. Conclusion: Respiratory morbidity is associated with workplace generated aerosol among dental health professionals. Awareness regarding occupational exposure and implementation of preventive strategies is required to provide a safe working environment.

How to Cite

1.
Mahmood SE, Ahmad A, Ahmad N, Muzammil K, Chander M, Siddiqui S. Aerosols exposure and respiratory morbidity among dental health care Professionals of Lucknow. Indian J Community Health [Internet]. 2019 Dec. 31 [cited 2022 Dec. 3];31(4):499-505. Available from: https://iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/article/view/1127

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Author Biography

Shireen Siddiqui, Integral Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

 

 

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